Cocktail in St. Moritz

Alessandra Bergamini

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8 FEB 2018
The perfect blend of Made in Italy by Baxter for Baltazhar, a new lounge bar and bistro in one of the most desirable Alpine destinations

With a name that has been a registered trade mark of international tourism for over eighty years, Saint Moritz is the ultimate luxury destination: UNESCO World Heritage Site for its Albula and Bernina railway lines, two Winter Olympics, five Alpine World Ski Championships, with an array of polo, bob and equestrian events to boot.

The latest addition to the list of renowned restaurants, hotels and shopping streets is a strictly Made in Italy project by Baxter’s style department and coordinated by Stefano Guidotti. After the alpine resorts in Madonna di Campiglio, La Thuile, Brigels, Achental, Lana, dachas of the Tinkoff Collection of Courchevel and Val Thorens, now it’s finally the turn of the Engadin’s most classical destination: St. Moritz, with the Balthazar lounge bar, just waiting to be discovered, not only for its cocktails, but also in virtue of its warm and inviting interiors laden with peaceful and emotional ambiences.

The main interior is characterised by the reassuring presence of an ancient moulded dark wooden bar counter introducing a small, more informal ‘living’ area with sofa, armchairs, side tables, and an area with tables and chairs where visitors can sip their cocktails. A captivating and welcoming effect is generated by diffused amber lighting, along with golden reflections propagated by Lais suspended lamps.

In addition to this convivial spaces we have two ‘corollaries’, more intimate interiors accessible via small openings, as though they were ‘hidden rooms’. The first of these is an elegant private lounge dedicated to Dom Pérignon, the second is the Chef Table hall, where guests dine in close contact with chefs at work. The kitchen is in full view, distinguished by a dark green ceramic cladding with chevron pattern, and a large floor-to-ceiling window which insulates, without concealing.

The overall design for Balthazar is made special by the articulated configuration of space, the lighting design, the layout of functional areas and the sheer richness of materials and decorations: full-bodied leathers covering seats and sofas, precious metals, blended forms and colours, and not least, the richness of coverings. In particular, the walls and ceilings of both private halls become an opportunity for flaunting inspired floral decorations, cascaded, or as a hyper-realistic backdrop.